Author Topic: DVLA  (Read 11012 times)

Offline Denni

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DVLA
« on: Oct 05 2008, 01:13 PM »
I have just been diagnosed with MD and I asked my consultant about whether or not I have to legally notify DVLA and he said that I don't have to do that.  I read the topid (from 2006) where someone kindly called DVLA and has clearly outlined this.  Does anyone have any up to date information about this?  I am confused as to what to do and obviously don't want to risk losing my licence but also want to know that I am not breaking the law.

ManiloonySally

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #1 on: Oct 05 2008, 01:16 PM »
Hi There

As long as you get prior warning of attacks and can pull over safely, you can keep your licence, if you don't, you have to inform the DVLA, have a look at their website, it will give you the information you need.  I had to surrender my licence for a while but did get it back although i rarely drive and certainly not far.

Sally

Offline gloverclare

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #2 on: Oct 05 2008, 03:44 PM »
Hi There,
              When i rang DVLA they told me it was a legal requirement to inform them & sent me the necessary form to complete, they just focus on dizzyness/vertigo & whether or not you get sufficient warning to pull car over safely. It may have changed since Oct'07 but i seriously doubt it. My GP/Consultant never told me to advise DVLA, i only found out it was a legal requirement when my work bosses told me about it. It's upto you what you do, but i'd personaly ring up for advice. Clare XX

Offline gloverclare

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #3 on: Oct 05 2008, 04:03 PM »
Sorry, just looked it up for you, DEFINITELY A LEGAL REQUIREMENT,REGARDLESS OF SYMPTOMS!  (They make decision once they have form completed & any other relevant info they might seek). Try not to panic though, many people retain their licences & chances are if that if your Consultant feels it's not an issue, he should be able to advise DVLA of this. You do have to give permission for them to contact GP/Consultant but they do not allways write to them & may just go on what you put on form. Good luck, Clare XX

ManiloonySally

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #4 on: Oct 05 2008, 04:32 PM »
Just in case i have caused any confusion, it was my Consultant that informed the DVLA and i had to surrender my licence, it wasn't because i had filled in the forms.  He was the one who then wrote to the DVLA when he felt i could have my licence back, but he has recently told me what i put in my first post, if i don't get prior warning, i must surrender it again, if i do, then i am ok at the moment, he advised me to look at the DVLA website to make sure i was doing the right thing.  Just thought i had better add this incase i have confused you :)

Sally

barbara

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #5 on: Oct 05 2008, 06:06 PM »
Hi All,
None of the above posts have mentioned insurance.If you notify the DVLA and you get prior warnings of attack you are allowed to drive and your insurance company cannot refuse to insure you or increase the premiums. This is covered by the DDA. If however you do not notify the DVLA and your Insurance and you have an accident your insurance company might decide that you were not fit to drive and therefore you were not insured.
The safest way to handle this is to inform the DVLA, be told you can drive, and then notify your insurance that you have a notifiable condition which the DVLA know about and have agreed to you driving. That way if you have an accident you are insured and you are not relying on good luck. It is much safer to drive without your fingers crossed behind your back.

Barbara

Offline gloverclare

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #6 on: Oct 06 2008, 01:29 PM »
Yes, sorry forgot the bit about informing insurance company on here, did mention it on another topic recently though. Both my personal car insurers & work company car insurers initialy refused me but i quoted the dda relevant info to them & they did change my their minds! ** Important note though, i had to send the letter of declaration from dvla as proof that i could drive as both insurers requested this., so do make sure you keep this letter. Clare XX

Offline Donna Allen

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #7 on: Jun 16 2012, 12:56 AM »
Hi there,

How long does it take for them to reply back after sending the forms off?

I was advised by my ENT to inform DVLA but still waiting to hear back from them.

Donna xxx

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #8 on: Jun 16 2012, 10:06 AM »
The wheels grind very slowly at the DVLA  8)

Offline chrissieg

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #9 on: Jun 16 2012, 11:49 AM »
I heard  within 2 weeks but was able to say I had warning of attacks so dont think they bothered getting in touch with consultant or GP. I think you have mentioned having drop attacks Donna , so I,m afraid it seems very unlikely you will keep your licence at the moment and , to be honest, it would be very dangerous for yourself and others. When that improves though, after 3 months, you can apply to have it returned.
Ironically, my consultant states in his research papers that it the least likely place to have an attack and he has never heard of an accident caused by an MD attack. As you,re seated and facing forward and focussing ahead, it is a good environment for balance p[roblems. But you can see why DVLA would be worried.

Chrissie
Chrissieg

Offline Emma

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #10 on: Jun 16 2012, 01:07 PM »
I have had loads of attacks whilst driving. Suddenly head feels like its going to explode and an attack starts. It is always gentle at first so am able to pull over but still happens :(
My GP told me I didn't need to inform DVLA sounds like I should. Can you keep driving while your information is with them? I have friends that work there wonder if they could hurry it up hehe xx
Be happy - Keep smiling :-D

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #11 on: Jun 16 2012, 01:31 PM »
My forms went in on 15 January.  Their last correspondence told me that they had received the medical information and a decision could take up to six weeks.  That was dated 14 March.  I still havenít heard from them.  As I say the wheels grind slowly.

The civil service does seem to work at a more relaxed pace.  God knows what mayhem I could have been wreaking on the roads in the intervening 5 months!

Chrissie just seems to lead a charmed life, whether dealing with the DVLA, flying, holidays, lack of vertigo attacks, salt avoidance techniques et al.  I am, of course, just jealous Chrissie!  :-[

Edit
And I have now just seen that your physio is only 10 minutes away.  Do you have any lottery numbers that you can share?  :)

Offline chrissieg

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #12 on: Jun 16 2012, 04:25 PM »
Hi Wobbler
I have been in some very dark places and been very ill with this condition but am currently coping and manageing reasonably well and feel it is important, especially for those recently diagnosed, to hear some good news from time to time and that there can be decent remission periods..I know I used to scour the forum for snippets which suggested that the illness wasnt always relentless in its destructive and disabling progress. I guess those folk who are doing well and no longer need support often leave the forum so the balance is perhaps misleading. I try to be a glass half full person and CBT at my lowest point, when I cried for virtually 4 months, helped me achieve that. I also find I cope better personally when I feel I am doing something positive to influence and help a situation- thats why I stick to the low salt thing, I feel I am retaining some control over my destiny with this thing. It also seems to be universally recommended across continents for MD so I wonder why wouldnt peole at least try it seriously for a while. I have met patients suffering terribly in waiting areas who say"its too hard" or "I cant not eat bacon" etc and I just dont understand that attitude when you are so ill.
I am sure that the worst symptoms will return at some point with a vengeance and I am not complacent about that.However, if my current relative  well being is winding up other members or making them feel worse, I am happy to abstain from the forum until such time as I need a higher level of support again.

Emma - sorry to be a killjoy but you are currently driving illegally and your insurance is invalid if you have failed to inform the DVLA of your MD. It is totally your responsibility to do so as it is classed as a dizziness condition which requires notification by yourself to DVLA. Sorry- my legal background coming out!
You can download the form  DIZ1 from the gov.uk site DVLA. There are a number ofquestions and info they seek. If you have warning of attacks, even if only a few minutes during which you can safely pull over, they are very likely to allow you to continue driving and just ask that you inform them if your condition deteriorates. You must also tell your insurers. they will probably not be very interested as they cannot legally charge you a higher premium if DVLA say its OK for you to drive. However, you should make a note of when you informed them. If you have an accident and need to assert you were not to blame, either through insurance or through the courts, the other side will do everything they can to lay the blame at your door, including that you have MD .If this happened and your insurance and licence were invalid through non declaration, you could literally go to prison, depending on the severity of the incident and its consequences.
Sorry to be so heavy but best to be covered and legal!
And finally, I'm sure we would all feel a lot brighter if that blasted sun put in an appearance - so fed up with this rain and cold!
Chrissie
Chrissieg

Offline Emma

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #13 on: Jun 16 2012, 06:43 PM »
Thank you for letting me know I shall be sure to do something about it ASAP :) am I okay to carry on driving while I wait a decision though?
Emx xx
Be happy - Keep smiling :-D

Offline chrissieg

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #14 on: Jun 16 2012, 07:07 PM »
Yes Emma , you are unless expressly told not to by doctor or consultant or you feel unsafe yourself of course.
Take care
Chrissie
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Offline The Wobbler

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #15 on: Jun 16 2012, 08:42 PM »
Hi Chrissie

It is good to hear of your positive news.  As you say it is easy to move on when things are better.  I too follow the low salt regime, but do not see it as a panacea in itself, just a contributory factor to MD wellbeing, alongside stress reduction, healthy eating and exercise.

As for the disparity between your 2 weeks and my 5 months and counting with the DVLA Ė I canít think that any amount of positive thinking could account for that!

BTW it was my work that insisted on the DVLA contact, not my GP or ENT.  I donít think that they can believe how long it is taking....

Offline Donna Allen

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #16 on: Jun 16 2012, 10:41 PM »
Hi there all,
Thank you all for your replies.
Chrissie, you are right I did suffer a severe attack with the drop attacks too! Good news is I haven't had a drop for 6 weeks now!!  ;D
Did you say that we can still drive while waiting for a decision from DVLA? If we feel safe enough to drive, because I feel safer to do so now.

Wobbler, 5 months!!! How do you cope?? 5 months is a long time  :(
Prayers they get they are quicker and that you  :(et your reply very soon. Do let us know.

Much love to you all
Donna xxx

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #17 on: Jul 11 2012, 03:22 PM »
Well the long awaited brown envelope turned up today marked with the DVLA logo.

Imagine my excitement that the answer as to whether I am safe to drive had finally arrived.  I have, after all, only waited 6 months and could have killed, maimed and injured scores of innocent bystanders in the meantime.

The letter states that they have written to my GP for further information and expect to receive a reply within six weeks.

Unbe fíing lieveable...!  :( >:( ::)  (That's for Benny).

Offline Elaine

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #18 on: Jul 12 2012, 11:23 AM »
Having been advised of what to do by members of forums and groups like this I sent in my form accompanied by a letter from my consultant and it was all done and dusted within a few weeks and I can retain my licence .I'd chase them up Wobbler .5 months is a ridiculously long time to wait - they need a kick up the back ide to get things moving for you  >:(
Elaine xx

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #19 on: Aug 01 2012, 06:23 PM »
Another letter from the DVLA today in one of their brown envelopes with the DVLA logo and marked IN CONFIDENCE.

This was it surely.  The moment of truth after months of waiting had finally arrived.  I was confident and so I finished my lunch before opening the missive.

When I did this is what it said:

I am writing to keep you updated on the progress of our enquiries into your fitness to drive.

We have now received medical information which has now been passed to the Medical Advisor for further advice, which could take up to six weeks.


I staggered.  Not through MD, but through the sheer incompetence of these people.  How long would they last in the private sector?

Offline Christina

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #20 on: Aug 03 2012, 07:50 AM »
I think the wait will be down to your doctor not sending the medical evidence back in a timely fashion.  DVLA themselves aren't too bad once they have the report back.  Hopefully not too much longer for a response.

Chris x
not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance in the rain ...

Offline JCaro

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Re: Chrissie, I need to do something about it
« Reply #21 on: Aug 19 2012, 12:19 PM »
Chrissie, its wonderfull to know you are much better now. Can you share some tips with us? I have had MD for about 4 months now, I am taking Prochlorperazine tablets but they don't always work. I heard about low salt...any thing else about diet? Please I need advise, anything.
Jaime

Offline chrissieg

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Re: DVLA
« Reply #22 on: Aug 19 2012, 02:46 PM »
Hi Jaime

I can tell you about myself and what I try to do but I always try to be cautious because MD is a very individual experience and what works for one may not help another at all. It is also really hard to know exactly what is working because of the episodic nature of the condition with natural remission periods from time to time.

However, I know I was so pleased when I was newly diagnosed and very poorly to read some encouraging stories . I have also met now with at least 5 people who have their MD controlled and are leading virtually normal lives  and thats always good to hear too.
I had about a year of increasing atack  problems culminating in 3 x 999 hospital admissions for really horrendous vertigo. I am very lucky to live in Leicester where the consultant is Mr Rea who is an MD expert. He has a private balance clinic here but you get the same quality of care from his NHS clinic and his ethos permeates down to his registrars too. I had 2 x MRIs which were clear so MD was diagnosed on the basis of the attacks, tinnitus and only 30% hearing in my left ear.
I was not prescribed anything for a long time pending the MRI results. I was then prescribed SERC 3x16 a day. My attacks stopped 4 days afterwards and I havent had one since - 23 months now. I haven't had the balance tests because by the time they were arranged, I was attack free and Mr Rea said not to "rock the boat". You have to come off the meds for the tests and as they seemed to be working for me , he said leave it until/ if I am bad again. I still wake up every morning expecting it to be today that it all comes back but I did have a letter from Mr Rea saying that although for most people it will return at some stage, there are a significant number of patients who dont get bad attacks again and that 80% of MD sufferers have it under reasonable control within 2- 3 yeras. Hope that sounds helpful! I still  religiously take the SERC though and have no plans to stop ever!
Prochlorperazine halps with the nausea and voiting during atacks and should only be taken as needed as it can have bad side effects if taken over a prolonged period. Tou can get a form of it called Buccastem which goes under the lip, is quickly absorbed and wont be thrown back up again!
I personally havent taken cinnarazine but some others find it better at the same job.
I have permanent tinnitus which I must have got used to some extent although never experiencing silence does sadden me sometimes. I belive giving up caffeine has helped keep that bearable. i used to drink maybe 15 cups of tea a day so thats a big difference.

In addition, I have been given about 10 sessions of vestibular physiotherapy to help with challenging environments such as supermarkets, crowds etc. I can use them again whenever I feel the need so that is reassuring

I also had Cognitive Behavioural therapy when I was first ill- 6 sessions which helped immeasurably with confidence and emotional well being and I still use the techniques when I am anxious about coping.
I follow the low salt diet - under 2.5 gs a day but relax that a little on special ocasions and holidays. Just got used to it now.  You need to count everything, even the milk in your drinks which is a pain initially but eventually, it gets to be second nature.I can drink alcohol without problems which is great. I have only ever  experienced a very few headaches  in my life so often wonder whether I am lucky so far in my MD experience because I dont have migraines as well, so less triggers. I know many people get both.
I also do Wiifit every morning for 30 mins to help with balance issues. If you,re younger and fitter than me, try to do some exercise if you can manage it.
The only other thing I can think of may be completely off the wall and irrelevant but I'll mention it anyway. I cut out aspartame in my food after my son did a school project which highlighted all the health concerns. The results were not conclusive but it made me realise how much of the stuff I was consuming in diet products etc and it wouldn't hurt to cut it out. Could be signicant?
Hope that helps a bit. If you want to know anything else about the low salt , search on this site as there are a lot of posts or I will try to answer any specific questions.
Take care and keep your chin up, you will get some better times
Chrissie
Chrissieg