meniere

Author Topic: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?  (Read 20564 times)

Offline Daisy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« on: Nov 05 2009, 04:43 PM »
Hi there,
I was wondering if anyone does the cawthorne cooksey exercises?  I've been dizzy and had mild rotational vertigo and bad balance since May. Some days/week its very mild and other days/week it quite severe.Each time I have been for a hosp appt they have always said how I must keep active, get dizzy etc etc to retrain my brain so that it can compensate. When I was diagnosed with MD in September and told to give up salt and reduce fluid to 1 litre and do the exercises, I had one bad week followed by a week or more of feeling absolutely NORMAL. I could do everything, go in lots of shops , be busy all day, run across roads etc etc and nothing apart from the computer made me dizzy. It was unbelievable. I hadn't felt like that since last year before I had my thyroid removed. I was all ready to come on here and sing the praises of a no - low salt diet with low fliud when suddenly I've got it all came back with a vengance- being dizzy for doing anything and staggering all over the place and getting very mild spins. Which  is really depressing after having a taste of being of my old self.
So is there any point to the exercises when I now know I can be normal one week and really bad the next? I had thought that my balance must of  been permanantly damaged but If I can be suddenly normal am I right in thinking that it hasn't? I'm finding this really hard to get my head round trying to understand it all, and question if I have done anything to make it so bad again.
I would appreciate your opinions on the exercises, I have only tried them a few times, and they have affected me differently each time, depending on how I am when I do them.

Daisy x :-\

barbara

  • Guest
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #1 on: Nov 05 2009, 04:50 PM »
Hi Daisy,
In order to do you any good the exercises have to be done fast enough to make you giddy so that your brain learns the new signals. Unfortunately as soon as you have an attack the exercise work is undone and you have to start them again.
If you get a good spell, keep doing them on and off so that your brain stays in tune with your body.
Barbara

Offline Daisy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #2 on: Nov 07 2009, 10:09 AM »
Hi There,
Thanks for your help Barbara,
Am I right in thinking then that everytime you have an attack part of our balance system is damaged/destroyed permanately? What happens when it is damaged completely? Can our brain actually compensate for that entirely? Would you never be dizzy again if that happened?
Please excuse questions I just would like to understand whats going on.
Thanks
Daisy


Offline Christina

  • Trusted member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3039
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #3 on: Nov 07 2009, 10:44 AM »
Hi Daisy

 Some people go into remission from MD, where balance recovers completely and you feel back to normal.  The system does have the ability to repair but with regular and continuous vertigo episodes, over time damage will occur.

Keeping balance doesn't just rely on one system, that's why it's possible to lose one of the components and still be able to walk.  However, you would be aware of it and never feel  normal.  Balance relies on 3 things - sight, inner ear and proprioceptors (these are receptors in ankles, legs, neck that help tell the brain about where we are in space).  If any one of these things is damaged, then balance will be affected.  All 3 systems work together in harmony usually, so for all 'normal' people out there it's not a conscious thing.  It becomes a conscious thing when one system isn't working properly. 

Alec, our forum Mod and owner, has had 2 VNS operations ie. both vestibular nerves have been severed by surgery so he has no messages from his inner ears to his brain and therefore no more vertigo.  However he would be the first to tell you that his balance is not normal and that he walks with sticks.  To him this is far preferable to the misery he experienced with severe vertigo.

So to answer your question, yes you would never have vertigo again but you may still be dizzy at times and feel disorientated because your brain would rely on messages from your eyes and those can be unreliable without the inner ear to help.  Your balance would definitely be affected.

Hope this helps.

Chris x
not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance in the rain ...

barbara

  • Guest
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #4 on: Nov 07 2009, 02:46 PM »
Hi Daisy,
Couldn't have put it any better than Chris. I have had one balance side destroyed and also have a lazy eye so only half visual focus. I react much as Alec with  no balance mechanism.I am not normal but manage day to day living without sticks. Still do the exercises on and off if I get a period when I am more disorientated but it is still better than having the vertigo.
Barbara

Offline Daisy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #5 on: Nov 10 2009, 01:44 PM »
Thanks Chris and Barbara that makes things much clearer. The drs. aren't very forthcoming, but then I suppose its because it affects everyone differently.
I gather from this site (which I am so pleased to have found),  that a lot of people are on serc. Is this for severe vertigo? mine is considerable mild though constant in comparison to many on this website. I wasn't offered serc and I'm wondering why, I know my consultant doesn't approve of stemital because of it stopping the brain compensating. Does serc cause the same problems?
Thanks again
Daisy x

Offline Christina

  • Trusted member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3039
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #6 on: Nov 10 2009, 08:23 PM »
Again, Serc is either favoured by a consultant or not - some believe it's no better than a placebo whilst others think it works.  Many patients are divided about whether it works or not.  Some swear by its benefits, whilst others find it makes no difference. 

Serc is not necessarily just prescribed for the more severe cases of vertigo, in fact even people with mild vertigo are still prescribed Serc.

Serc has a different action than Stemetil.  It causes vasodilation which increases blood flow to the inner ear and this is supposed to help with prevention of attacks, thought to be caused by a build up fluid.  Stemetil is an antihistamine, with sedating properties.  Serc doesn't cause drowsiness and does not stop the brain compensating. 

Hope this helps
Chris x
not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance in the rain ...

Offline Daisy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #7 on: Nov 13 2009, 11:27 AM »
Thank you for being so helpful, I really appreciate it. These are the sort of questions I save up for the dr and then forget to ask!
I'm really sorry Chris to read you've been diagnosed with MS, It must of been a real blow. I didn't realise that the symptoms were the same as MD. How are the injections going, are they getting any easier. I hope things are improving for you.
 Daisy x

Offline lyn

  • Visitor
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #8 on: Jul 31 2010, 01:25 PM »
hi, i new to this site, so hope this posts. i been diagnosed with menieres now about a year. had vertigo symptons for aprox 2 years. just had brain scan, all ok. now been given Cawthorne Cookson exercises,
it is an horrible condition and just hope to be normal again!
I find when fluid builds up, earache worse and dizzy spells worse. I take serc 16 mg 3 times a day and i really feel they help. If i miss a tablet i really do feel worse.

Offline Christina

  • Trusted member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3039
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #9 on: Jul 31 2010, 04:10 PM »
Hi Lyn

Welcome to the site, glad you found us.  You're right, it is a horrible condition but I'm pleased to hear you feel Serc is working for you.  Have a browse round the site, there is a lot to read and lots of information to take in.

Chris x
not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance in the rain ...

Offline lyn

  • Visitor
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #10 on: Aug 21 2010, 01:13 PM »
Hi Christina, sorry for delay in replying, but yes site is good just taking me long time to get to grips with how to operate it, learnt a lot but sadly no real miracle answers...

Offline Christina

  • Trusted member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3039
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #11 on: Aug 21 2010, 06:42 PM »
Not a problem Lyn.  Unfortunately, there are no miracle answers I agree.  Wouldn't it be lovely though if there were!

Chris x
not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance in the rain ...

NEWOSA65

  • Guest
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #12 on: Aug 22 2010, 04:23 PM »
Hi, the exercises for balance work provided you have enough rehab time for them to work, so i think the best treatment always lies in getting the attacks under control either by tablets (..in rare cases!) or by surgical procedures.  Best wishes, S

Offline lyn

  • Visitor
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Do Cawthorne cooksey exercises help?
« Reply #13 on: Aug 26 2010, 02:11 PM »
been doing some of the exercises a week now and do think they are helping.havent tried all the standing ones yet,  Don't think i could have done them when feeling really bad. earache not as bad.still no ear wax from offending ear. Is this common? Do notice if i miss my medication though, i take 16mg betahistamine 3 times a day. regards Lyn