Author Topic: When do you give in?  (Read 964 times)

Offline milady

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When do you give in?
« on: Oct 19 2017, 07:01 PM »
The random vertigo continues, but lately it has been mainly brief, sudden, fast spins, which I have been able to 'stare down' by concentrating on what I was doing at the time as much as possible, and things have usually stabilised within a few minutes. This morning, I was less successful, despite staggering gently downstairs with the washing bin as I'd intended, and then having breakfast (partly because if you're going to be sick it helps to have something to bring up. (sorry, TMI?)). I managed to last about half an hour, before I decided I really would be better off in bed for a while, rather than trying to read the paper while it drifted gently sideways.

So, should I have given in straight away? Or do any of you find that a bit of b****y mindedness works better? I suppose it depends where you are and what you're doing, to some extent, but I feel I have better, more interesting things I could be doing and the spinning does get in the way!

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #1 on: Oct 20 2017, 08:44 AM »
The answer (as for all MD questions) is “it depends”.

Personally, I have always found that temporary submission to the beast generally gives better results than fighting it in a battle with only one winner.

Offline MissCheeva

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #2 on: Oct 20 2017, 08:51 AM »
I agree with Wobbler in the 'it depends' department.  If I am just feeling unbalanaced then I keep going, but if things are actually spinning (as in vertigo) then I lie down.  I have found that fighting vertigo always ends badly for me.  Whereas fighting slight off balance normally does the trick.  The problem we all have is that this illness can be very personal, in that what works for one doesn't always work for another.  I would experiment and see what suits you best.

HTH
MissCheeva

Offline milady

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #3 on: Oct 20 2017, 07:00 PM »
I think I will end up in the 'it depends' camp too; time and place make a difference. Now that I have a 'probably Meniere's' diagnosis, I feel I know more what to expect and don't have the 'OMG!' reaction, rather the 'oh b****r' one. If things just start to drift a bit I can tell myself firmly that it isn't really happening and distract my attention. If it all goes off like a rocket, it isn't so easy, but it helps to have a plan, even if it's only to find a soft spot and keel over! The beast has been lurking for the last half hour (what set it off this time?), but I'm refusing to make eye contact... ;)

Offline chrissieg

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #4 on: Oct 22 2017, 10:39 PM »
I haven't suffered a biggie for some time but , with hindsight, do believe that some of the smaller attacks I experienced, were , in fact, more likely to be anxiety provoked panic attacks. I used to be so frightened of a full blown affair in difficult situations such as at work or while travelling or other potentially embarassing scenes. Any slight imbalance or wobbly moment would send me into a such a panic that the result was either a pseudo attack or a real attack caused by the stress/panic.
When a big vertigo one occurred- some up to 24 hours and requiring hospitalisation, I really couldn't have powered through. I had to lie absolutely still in bed with my eyes as open as possible and be helped to the toilet when needed. Only eventually falling asleep would help. Once I understood what was happening, knew more about MD and accepted I couldn't stop the attack and had to just let the attack run its course, I became more philosophical about it all. In turn, that reduced anxiety and made the attacks less severe and shorter. I tried to adopt a sort of " here we go again, what a bore"attitude and it seemed to help.
I would agree , that in terms of the general unsteadiness periods, its best to try and distract yourself if at all possible. If appropriate, I even find a glass of wine can help relax me. You seem as though you have a healthy and helpful approach already to the condition- accepting it for what it is and not letting it dominate your thoughts and actions and future plans so you still have as full a life as possible
Good luck
Chrissie
Chrissieg

Offline milady

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #5 on: Oct 23 2017, 07:12 PM »
Thanks for your comments Chrissieg.

I try to carry on as normal, day to day, doing everything I used to do (except driving >:() and working on the assumption that I will probably be fine. Keeping that assumption going is probably not as easy as I make it sound. I try not to think 'what if?' though that thought does lurk constantly below the surface. I try not to monitor every little 'odd' moment because they probably aren't odd at all, just things I never noticed before. At first I did tend to lie awake in the night (always a bad idea) wondering what I would do if the vertigo came on while I was out of the house. The biggest problem seemed to be being able to stop other people from flapping because they would have no idea what was going on. Finally I decided that I would just have to take things as they come. So far that seems to have worked, but it's always reassuring to talk to people who know exactly how unsettling and unpleasant sudden vertigo can be.

Offline chrissieg

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #6 on: Oct 23 2017, 10:48 PM »
Yes, you're right,

Although I have relaxed them a bit now , I do have definite strategies always employed and others I used to always do, They just gave me more confidence when out and about and let me feel I had some control.

Have a bowl , loo roll and meds under the bed!

Keep sunglasses and hat in the car for use in supermarkets

Always use a trolley in supermarkets even if only for a few items- its something to lean on

Book seats at end of rows in theatres and cinemas etc so you can leave quickly if necessary and not disturb too many

Keep a small plastic bag in handbag in case of vomiting

Keep musicians earplugs in handbag in case of very noisy environment so you can still hear conversations

Sit next to windows in environments like airports where strip lighting exists

Have a couple of decaff tea bags and sachets of decaff coffee in handbag.

I had a bad vertigo attack once in the middle of interviewing someone for a job. I ended up in hospital. Yes , it was professionally embarrassing for a while but, in a way, it was helpful. The worst fear had happened and everyone coped, no-one died, people were very kind and I was more or less OK within  a few days. So, it helped not worry all the time about "what if,,,".

Take care

Chrissie




Chrissieg

Offline Silver Fox

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #7 on: Nov 05 2017, 11:21 AM »
I'm fortunate that I get pre-warning of an attack so tend to give in straight away and take to my bed asap. Like a lot of others I dread planning an outing or future event as it is always in my mind what if. Perhaps if I could get over this trend I would not raise my anxiety levels and perhaps reduce my attacks. However I'm finding this very hard to do. Any suggestions welcome.

Ed

Offline chrissieg

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #8 on: Nov 05 2017, 03:42 PM »
The thing which helped me most Ed with the feelings you describe was a course of Cognitive Behavioural therapy- or CBT. It is available to everyone through your GP on NHS though the wait can be long. I was lucky that my employers funded a few sessions privately for me. It really did change my mind set and helped enormously. It works on the premise that what you think will become what you feel and that is likely to affect how you behave/act. If you can change your mind set , then your feelings should improve and consequently your behaviour. It stopped me focussing on "what if " scenarios and taught me how to have the confidence to cope. Thoroughly recommend it but do go into it with an open mind. I have referred clients for CBT group work for years and it was interesting to be on the receiving end instead but now I can say I have practised what I preach!

Chrissie
Chrissieg

Offline milady

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #9 on: Nov 05 2017, 07:43 PM »
A bit of warning would be nice - how do you apply to get that?

A friend of mine suffered for many years with what is called transient loss of consciousness. She would pass out for a moment and drop, coming round before she hit the ground, but too late to stop the fall. (Most embarrassing when she did it in the pub!) Her advice to me was to act as far as possible as 'normal' otherwise the 'what if' would drive you crazy and you'd never do anything or even leave the house. Following her experience further, I carry several copies of a chit giving name, address, emergency contact, GP contact, NHS number and medication details, and on the other side in large letters, Meniere's disease, vertigo, loss of balance etc so that these are available in the event I need help and to explain what is going on. I also have a sick bag, in case. Thus prepared, I tell myself firmly that I will be fine and sally forth to walk, or cycle or whatever. So far, so good, though 'what if' still mutters in the background.

My friend found that people were usually very helpful when she crashed out - usually they would prop her up and call an ambulance. The local paramedics knew her quite well. Luckily for her she has been clear for over 12 months now, and can drive again (I'm quite jealous :))

Offline Silver Fox

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #10 on: Nov 06 2017, 02:30 PM »
Thanks for your replies I will certainly look into the CBT route as my wife says I've to start and look at this differently.
With regard to the pre-warning I get it seems I'm fortunate in that respect. It allows me to get home if I'm close enough or to alert my wife to collect me. As everyone else seems to do I've the usual sick bags etc.
Seeing my consultant again this Thursday so hopefully more progress will be made.

Ed

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: When do you give in?
« Reply #11 on: Nov 06 2017, 07:04 PM »
Looking at things differently will completely change your perspective!  ;)