Author Topic: Visual Vertigo  (Read 302 times)

Offline harry

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Visual Vertigo
« on: Aug 11 2018, 02:48 PM »
Visual vertigo is different from the "out of nowhere" rotational vertigo associated with MD. It has a trigger which is visual movement like TV,Scrolling on a tablet/phone or movement in the background.

It is a separate thing but I hear that it is common amongst MD sufferers.

I have had it a while and it comes and goes like MD.

In my case the Vertigo is like a "correction" rather than a full blown continuous rotating/spinning room. Ie my head and eyes start to spin then it makes an almost instant correction to sort it out.

I can have serveral of these a day ad it can last for several days( currently 12 days)

It also makes me a bit unstaedy balance wise and very tired.There are also hints of MD like extra fullness and louder tinituss etc but no full blown vertigo attacks although that may be because i have increased my SERC to 5 x 3 times per day ( from 2)

My question is how many others have been diagnosed with Visual Vertigo alongside their MD?

and

Has anyone found a way of reducing the time it takes to recover from a bout of VV apart from not watching TV or using laptop etc?



 



Offline dmj

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Re: Visual Vertigo
« Reply #1 on: Aug 12 2018, 09:03 AM »
hello Harry

I am not sure if this is the same but i have been diagnosed with visual preference which means that I am more dependent on my eyes for my balance.  I do not understand this completely but I think it means that in environments where there is a lot of visual stimuli eg crowds, very quick camera shots on tv I can feel dizzy and lightheaded.  I don't get any spinning but I find it very uncomfortable.   

vestibular rehabilitation can help with visual preference but its best done with a specialist.

https://www.menieres.org.uk/information-and-support/treatment-and-management/vestibular-rehabilitation

it might be worth asking your consultant about.

Offline The Wobbler

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Re: Visual Vertigo
« Reply #2 on: Aug 12 2018, 10:11 AM »
I have always understood from my ENT that the visual triggers were a MAV component to my MD diagnosis.  The effects have always been very similar, and my way of dealing with them is the same Ė lie or sit still with eyes closed until the vertigo passes.  He prescribed Pizotifen, since when the incidences have been rare.  Of course, the other (and probably more important) factor is that experience teaches us to avoid the triggers in the first place.  For me that has included;

Jerky camera work on TV (news items with running cameramen and mobile phone footage).
Some slewing vehicle and wheel motions on TV.
Swirling and gaudy graphics on TV.
Long intense computer sessions.
Constricted view walkways including long hospital corridors, supermarket aisles, narrow brick walled alleyways.
Driving at night on a deserted motorway.
I havenít tried a fairground ride and I donít intend to!  :)

Visual preference is a product of a compromised vestibular system.  The brain adapts to be more reliant on eyesight.  Hence the problems when the room is plunged into darkness.  My ENT does the Unterberger test on my visits and my failure to remain on, or even near, the spot is always a revelation.

Offline chrissieg

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Re: Visual Vertigo
« Reply #3 on: Aug 14 2018, 12:30 PM »
I agree with Wobbler- all that he lists can make me feel decidedly weird but usually only briefly. It is usually at its worse after prolonged laptop use . I went to see Swan Lake and the dancing to and fro across the stage triggered it also. Watching falling snow can do so too.I think probably the immediate panic you feel that it may be a full on vertigo attack about to occur is probably worse than the actual sensation.

So, I think to answer your question Harry that for many of us it is not a question of suffering a spell of it, its actually more or less permanently there and we learn to avoid the triggers. My very worst experience was at Mexico City airport in the appalling departure lounge designed to torture MD sufferers, I couldn't go elsewhere so sat rigidly staring into my handbag with sunglasses and a hood up for 2 hours!


take care

Chrissie
Chrissieg

Offline harry

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Re: Visual Vertigo
« Reply #4 on: Aug 14 2018, 03:50 PM »
Thanks for responding

Like I say I have had this alongside my MD for a long time and like you it can happen at any time and like you I try to avoid the well known triggers for VV and it normally only happens once or twice a month.

But I also get times where it is very concentrated and will have several moments in a day even with very small use of TV and laptops.Then starts to improve over the course of 2 weeks. perhaps it's just down to tiredness and stress. ( I do have a lazy eye that just sort of shuts down when I get tired) or could be down to the fact that I have been reducing my SERC over the last year again?


I mentioned it to my consultant many years ago who said yes it was visual vertigo but it was not linked to my MD as a symptom so to speak but was common in MD sufferers. I assume it is just part of having a knackered vestibular system.


I decided many years ago that there was no "trigger" for an MD attack it just happens when it wants to and I don't try to fight it or control it. But I do know that there are certain things that can make my balance go off or unsteady and certain things like the list above that can "trigger" a VV moment. I try to avoid/reduce those triggers.


Clearly I have got complacent and need to remind myself to "behave" again.


But it is interesting to hear that other MD sufferers get a  bit of the old VV when exposed to certain triggers. I have never been sure wether it's normal,me,MD or my eyes ( which are not great)


Anyway onwards and upwards

Harry



Offline MissCheeva

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Re: Visual Vertigo
« Reply #5 on: Sep 07 2018, 09:04 AM »
Hi Harry,

I guess I too suffer from VV.  I haven't been diagnosed as such, but the symptoms you describe fit some of the wobbles (as I call them) I get.  I work at a computer screen all day and often find that intense bouts can bring that on.  I find that leaving my screen helps and walking around.  I just really challenge myself on the balance front to get my brain to recalibrate (as such).  I do this by doing things that I find difficult (walking in a straight line ;) ).  I actually have it at the moment.  I figure it will sort itself out when it is ready.

HTH